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Architecture
{thumb} Giza Pyramids -- 2006.01.18
Memorials to Egyptian kings, the pyramids of Giza still rise above the desert after 4,000 years. Stone, not sun-dried mud brick, promised permanence for these monuments.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.12.07. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1990. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Luxor -- 2005.12.26
Twilight lingers over the tomb of Ramses III in the Valley of Kings in Luxor, Egypt.[=] Credits: Photo by Kenneth Garrett. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Luxor Hieroglyphs -- 2006.01.12
The mortuary temple of Ramses III, Madinet Habu, towers on the west bank of the Nile. Its hieroglyphs describe battles with Libyans and invaders called Sea Peoples. To ancient Egyptians writing was a gift from Thoth -- scribe of the gods.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2004.04.15. Photo by Cary Wolinsky, 1999. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Angkor Thom -- 2006.01.12
Ghostlike faces surround two saffron-robed Buddhist monks in a window of the extravagantly carved Bayon, central temple of Angkor Thom in northwestern Cambodia.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2004.04.22. Photo by Wilbur E. Garrett, 1968. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Ladakh -- 2005.12.26
Ladakh is in northern India's Himalayas. As the architecture suggests, it is a center of Tibetan Buddhism and culture. It is one of the highest and driest places on the planet.[=] Credits: Photo from unknown source.
{thumb} Machu Pichu -- 2002.11.26
The ruins of the Machu Picchu on an Andean mountaintop (2800 m elevation), remnants of massive Incan stone structures from the early 1400s. The Spaniards never found Machu Picchu, though they suspected its existence. The sanctuary was abandoned some forty years after the Spanish took Cuzco in 1533.[=] Credits: Photo by Don Thomson, 1969.
{thumb} Taos Pueblo -- 2005.12.29
Taos Pueblo, NM. Resisting white influences, many Taos Indians choose to live without telephones, electricity, or running water.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.11.29. Photo by Dick Durrance II, 1976. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Birkat al Mawz -- 2006.01.14
At Birkat al Mawz in Oman boxy concrete homes have replaced the old mud-brick housing beyond. Mountain runoff irrigates dense groves of date palms, a source of a staple food.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.07.05. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1994. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Algiers -- 2006.01.17
The city's arcaded quay was built by the French, whose 132-year rule of Algeria ended in 1962. Beyond Algiers lie fertile coastal plains and the vast oil-rich desert.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.02.04. Photo by Thomas J. Abercrombie, 1972. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2003.
{thumb} Marrakesh Garden -- 2006.01.20
In the cut-stone courtyard of Medersa ben Youssef garden, in Marrakesh, Morocco, a dark rectangle of still water reflects the intricate architecture.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.03.26. Photo by Sam Abell, 1998. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Cairo Mosque -- 2006.01.17
Built inside the Citadel, former headquarters of Egypt's rulers, the Turkish-style Muhammad Ali mosque honors the early 19th-century leader credited with bringing the city and the nation into modern times.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.02.01. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1990. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2003.
{thumb} Petra Temple -- 2006.01.20
From a rooftop carved two millennia ago, a Bedouin surveys the realm of the Nabataeans, in what is now Jordan. This immense building, Al Deir (the Monastery), was probably a Nabataean shrine.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.07.10. Photo by Annie Griffiths Belt, 1998. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Blue Mosque -- 2005.12.29
Istanbul. Illuminated by the setting sun, the Blue Mosque got its name from its interior tiles. Built for Sultan Ahmet I in the early 1600s, the mosque was the first (aside from Mecca's Kaaba shrine) with six minarets.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.06.01. Photo by Steve McCurry, 1887. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Istanbul -- 2006.01.17
Monument to a mighty ruler, Istanbul's many-domed Suleymaniye complex looks over the Golden Horn, Bosporus, and Sea of Marmara to Asia.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.01.24. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1986. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2003.
{thumb} Moldavia Voronet -- 2006.01.12
The 15th-century monastery church of Voronet bears frescoes inside and out that illustrate Romanian folklore and Bible stories. The remarkably preserved painted churches of Moldavia are a regional adaptation of Byzantine art.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2004.10.05. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1982. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Monaco -- 2006.02.28
Somehow it seems wrong for there to be tall buildings in Monaco.[=] Credits: Photo by mcx6, 2006.02.28. Copyright Hebus.Com, 2006.
{thumb} Mount Athos -- 2006.01.11
The 14th-century Simonopetra Monastery towers high above the Aegean Sea on a small peninsula of northeastern Greece. It's part of a religious community named after snowcapped Mount Athos, background.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2004.08.18. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1982. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Oman Nakhl -- 2006.01.14
Sentinel of the past, the restored fort at Nakhl, Oman attests Omani skill at military architecture: Built before A.D. 600, such fortresses strongly influence the design of Omani buildings -- even telephone booths.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.09.13. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1993. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Bhutan Monastery -- 2006.01.17
In serene isolation, a dzong, or monastic fortress, in central Bhutan reflects the spirit of this Himalayan kingdom, thrust into the glare of modern times after centuries of solitude.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.01.02. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1989. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2003.
{thumb} Sulawesi Houses -- 2006.01.31
Bundled up Sulawesi children sit in front of intricately designed dwellings. The eaves of the roofs curve upward, similar to the sterns of ships, projecting dramatically beyond the ends of the houses.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2006.01.31. Photo by Winfield Parks, 1972. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2006.
{thumb} Jodhpur India -- 2006.01.17
Jodhpur's Mehrangarh Fort, a walled city built in the 15th century, evokes the days when India was divided into hundreds of princely states.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.01.23. Photo by Steve McCurry, 1996. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2003.
{thumb} Taj Mahal -- 2006.01.19
Reflecting the passions of Mogul Emperor Shah Jahan, the Taj Mahal in Agra was built in the mid-1600s as a tomb for his wife Mumtaz Mahal. Later he was buried beside her.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.09.23. Photo by Steve McCurry, 1996. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Proudfoots -- 2006.01.05
Built in the 1800's, the buildings that house Proudfoot's in Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia are still used as a boat club, tea room, and restaurant.[=] Credits: NGPOD archive, 2005.01.15. Photo by Sam Abell, 1995. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Charleston -- 2005.12.31
Historic antebellum mansions are plentiful in Charleston, SC's Battery neighborhood. The area looks out over Charleston Harbor and Fort Sumter, the site of the first shots of the U.S. Civil War.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.04.25. Photo by Bob Sacha, 1999. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Greenhouse -- 2006.01.20
Greenhouses afford soft, wrapping light. The glass houses, half separated from the world, create a secluded, sheltering atmosphere, not only for plants but also for people.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.04.17. Photo by Sam Abell, 1980. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Chengde Palace -- 2006.01.14
Emperor Kang Xi commissioned the palace of Chengde in 1703 as a summer resort. The property is now a public park, containing landscaped gardens, ancient gnarled pines, lotus ponds, artifacts, and artwork.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.10.08. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1981. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Colosseum -- 2006.01.12
Rome's 1,900-year-old Colosseum, remnant of bloody gladiatorial duels in Imperial times, serves today as a traffic circle and tourist attraction.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2004.04.29. Photo by Winfield I. Parks, Jr, 1970. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Vatican City -- 2006.01.18
Dominated by the basilica, the State of Vatican City forms an enclave in Rome west of the Tiber. The twin arms of Bernini's colonnade embrace St. Peter's Square; at its center stands an obelisk from ancient Egypt.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.12.23. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1985. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Toledo Spain -- 2006.01.18
Suspended between heaven and earth, Toledo -- Spain's spiritual heart -- has changed little from the day the Greek painter El Greco arrived in the 1570s.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.12.02. Photo by James P. Blair, 1981. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Bridge -- 2006.02.08
Somewhere in France, I suppose. Bravo for the photographer. Notice also the details of the fine stonework in the bridge's arch.[=] Credits: Photo by Talou, 2006.02.08. Copyright Hebus.Com 2006.
{thumb} Carcassonne -- 2006.01.16
The city of Carcassonne, in the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France.[=] Credits: Photo by Marieclaire, 2006.01.13. Copyright Hebus.Com, 2006.
{thumb} Chateau Ravalets -- 2006.03.05
The Chateau des Ravalets, in Normandie near Cherbourg, was built between 1562 and 1575.[=] Credits: Hebus.Com. Photo and copyright Urban, 2006.03.03.
{thumb} Eiffel Tower -- 2005.12.29
Celebrating Bastille Day with an unusual view of the most famous structure in Paris.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.07.14. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1988. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Louvre -- 2006.01.14
I.M. Pei's stark glass pyramid marks the entrance to the Louvre Museum in Paris. Once a royal palace, the Louvre has been a national museum since 1793.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.11.23. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1998. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Notre Dame de Paris -- 2006.01.18
Notre Dame was the first cathedral to make use of a full Gothic vocabulary -- flying buttresses, rose and other windows of stained glass, pointed arches, and rib vaulting.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2002.12.25. Photo by James L. Stanfield, 1988. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2002.
{thumb} Place des Vosges -- 2006.01.11
The graceful geometry of the Place des Vosges in Paris is the legacy of Henry IV, who in the first decade of the 17th century envisioned a public space lined by shops and homes.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2004.05.17. Photo by William Albert Allard, 2002. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} St Basils Moscow -- 2006.01.21
The distinctive spires, cupolas, domes, and arches of St. Basil's Cathedral soar over Moscow's Red Square. Ivan the Terrible commissioned the cathedral in the mid-16th century.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2001.12.27. Photo by Sisse Brimberg, 1998. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2001.
{thumb} St Isaacs Petersburg -- 2006.01.05
Built between 1818 and 1858 by French architect Auguste de Montferrand, St. Isaac's Cathedral is dusted by a winter snow. Lit by passing cars and holiday lights, it still dominates the St. Petersburg skyline.[=] Credits: NGPOD archive, 2005.01.21. Photo by Sisse Brimberg, 1997. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} Lake Onega -- 2006.01.14
The cutter Wild Goose sails on Lake Onega, Russia, past the churches of Kizhi Island, bound for the Black Sea.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2003.07.17. Photo by James P. Blair, 1992. Copyright National Geographic Society, 2004.
{thumb} Sydney Opera -- 2005.12.31
Designed in 1957 and finished in 1973, Australia's Sydney Opera House, which faces the harbor, was seen as far ahead of its time architecturally.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.03.31. Photo by Sam Abell, 1995. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
{thumb} NYC Blackout -- 2003.09.16
The unexpected starscape was perhaps a small benefit during the Aug. 14, 2003 blackout. Prominent in this montage are the Moon and Mars above an eerily dark New York City seen from New Jersey. Visible lights are from local power generators, flashlights, and candles.[=] Credits: APOD archives, 2003.08.18. Copyright: Bill Rosen.
{thumb} London Camden Town -- 2005.12.31
Markets and shops in northern London's Camden Town have made the neighborhood a center of open-air activity. Shops selling vintage furniture, local crafts, and artwork attract Londoners and tourists alike.[=] Credits: NGPOD, 2005.04.16. Photo by Jodi Cobb, 1999. Copyright: National Geographic Society, 2005.
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